VOICE May 2016 - page 6

To perform as leaders, we need to fuel our bodies
and our minds. We all know this. The challenges
that work schedules and eating away from home
can give us though, are obstacles we need to over-
come if we’re going to be the best we can at work
and away from work.
My clients often tell me they find it hard to choose
healthy food, to find healthy food or to know what
healthy food is. The fact that they’re telling me
means that they want to do something about it, or
it’s got to the point where they need to do some-
thing for their immediate or longer term health.
My role is to help coach them to understand their
personal needs and to educate them about the best
solutions.
The implications of not feeding ourselves well can
be the short term effects of lack of concentration,
low energy, lack of stress resilience, or the longer
term effects of digestive issues, weight gain, or
more serious health issues like heart problems and
diabetes.
You also need to consider that as a leader you’re a
role model for your teams and colleagues. They’ll
see what you eat and the choices you make in the
canteen and in meetings; as well as experience the
decisions you make. All of us are aware of the
growing media focus on nutrition and self-
responsibility. By being educated in this area you
become more in control of your own health and
performance. You become able to show an educated
response to your own health and to those around
you.
In this next section I describe some simple strat-
egies that you can follow:
Follow this basic strategy when you’re creating
a meal in the canteen, at home or away from
home.
1) What protein am I going to eat? Chicken, meat,
fish, eggs, dairy, nuts or pulses.
2) What vegetables/salad am I going to add?
3) What carbohydrates am I adding? Vegetables,
potatoes, bread, crackers or oatcakes.
Follow this balanced plate principle to maintain
or manage weight:
· ¼ plate protein. E.g. 2 eggs, chicken breast or
fish size of your palm
· ¼ plate carbohydrate E.g. Fistful of cooked
wholemeal rice (more if you exercise), slice of
bread
· ½ plate vegetables E.g. Salad, tomatoes,
mushroom, asparagus (Starches are in the carbo-
hydrate section E.g. Potatoes).
Fine Tune for your Specific Needs:
Lack of Concentration:
This suggests that your
brain hasn’t got enough fuel, you can have a quick
chocolate bar or coffee but this can lead to sugar
highs and lows, stress the body and cause weight
gain. Instead have a piece of fibrous fruit, that
means an apple or an orange, or if it’s a sweeter
fruit like a banana you should also have some nuts.
Healthy Leaders: Eating for
Performance
“The implications of not feeding ourselves
well can be the short term effects of lack of
concentration, low energy, lack of stress
resilience, or the longer term effects of
digestive issues, weight gain, or more
serious health issues like heart problems
and diabetes.
Lack of Concentration: This suggests
that your brain hasn’t got enough
fuel, you can have a quick chocolate
bar or coffee but this can lead to
sugar highs and lows, stress the body
and cause weight gain. Instead have a
piece of fibrous fruit, that means an
apple or an orange, or if it’s a sweeter
fruit like a banana you should also
have some nuts.
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